A Huge Million-Year-Old, Man-Made Underground Complex?

March 4, 2016

Most archaeologists and historians agree that human civilization only emerged some 10,000 to 12,000 years ago. Yet many researchers have drawn attention to artifacts and various other evidence of advanced civilizations long before this, even millions of years earlier.

Among them is Dr. Alexander Koltypin, a geologist and director of the Natural Science Research Center at Moscow’s International Independent University of Ecology and Politology.

Koltypin has analyzed ancient underground structures across the Mediterranean and identified similarities that lead him to believe the sites were once connected. Furthermore, the weathering of the structures, their material composition, and the geological features and historic changes in the region, lead him to believe they were built by an advanced civilization hundreds of thousands or millions of years ago.

Archaeologists working in the region usually date the sites by looking at the settlements located on them or nearby. But these settlements were simply built upon existing prehistoric structures, Koltypin said.

“When we examined the constructions … none of us never for a moment had a doubt that they are much older than the ruins of the Canaanite, Philistine, Hebraic, Roman, Byzantine, and other cities and settlements that are placed on it and around,” he wrote on his website.

He climbed a hill about 1,300 feet high near the Hurvat Burgin ruins in Adullam Grove Nature Reserve, central Israel. As he looked over the site, he recalled a similar feeling from when he had climbed to the top of the rock city Cavusin in Turkey.

“I was personally convinced once again … that all these rectangular indentations, man-made underground structures, and scattered debris of megaliths were one underground-terrestrial megalithic complex which was opened by erosion to a depth of several hundred meters.”

Erosion and Mountain-Formation

Not all parts of the purported complex are still underground. Some have come far above ground with geological shifts throughout history—the ancient rocky towns of Cappadocia in Turkey, for example, which Koltypin includes in the complex.

Some parts may also be found under the Mediterranean Sea, as is indicated by structures along the coast.

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