Avoiding The Sun Trend Causing Global Rise In Cancers

August 12, 2016

Chavin It is a common sight these days to come across girls riding their two-wheelers and scooties, all covered up to avoid the sun’s rays on their person. They even wrap a stole around their faces, such that not an inch of their face is seen, and wear gloves to keep the sun away from their skin.

Experts say that despite living in a tropical climate, it is unfortunate that many don’t expose themselves to the sun to get the RDA (recommended daily allowance) of vitamin D.

According to nutritionist Dharini Krishnan we don’t expose ourselves enough to the sun. “We sleep in air-conditioned bedrooms, commute in air-conditioned cars and work in air-conditioned offices. Even those who travel by bikes cover themselves from head to toe. We don’t want to expose ourselves to sunlight even for a few minutes.

This results in vitamin D deficiency as sunlight is the only major source of vitamin D. All we need to do is stand under the sun for 15 minutes at least three times a week. Our lifestyle is lethargic and we depend a lot on air-conditioners. It is good to get exposed to the sun from 10am to 4pm to get the needed vitamin D for our body.”

Exposure to ultraviolet B radiation in sunlight provides the mechanism for more than 90% of the vitamin D production in most individuals. The widespread use of sunscreens, particularly those with high sun protection factors (SPF), may lead to a significant decrease in solar-induced previtamin D3 in the skin, resulting in a vitamin D level which is insufficient for protection against a wide range of diseases.

There are well over 800 references in the medical literature showing vitamin D’s effectiveness–both for the prevention and treatment of cancer.

The results, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, showed that women who had at least 21 hours a week exposure to the sun’s UV rays in their teens were 29 percent less likely to get cancer than those getting under an hour a day.

For women who spent the most time out side in their forties and fifties, the risk fell by 26 percent and for those above 60, sunshine halved their chances of a tumour.

Exposure to sunlight and ultraviolet light has been repeatedly shown to NOT be the cause of skin cancer. Scientists from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported UVA exposure is unlikely to have contributed to the rise in the incidence of melanoma over the past 30 years.

For melanoma, it is only latitudinal variation that favours the hypothesis of sun exposure causation. It is postulated that skin temperature by itself may suffice to account for the observed variation of melanoma with latitude.

The higher incidence of melanoma in the higher social classes and its increasing incidence with age may be readily explained by the hypothesis that melanoma incidence increases with increase in skin temperature which scientists have incorrectly linked to the sun as the primary causative factor.

No scientific literature has ever proven that sunlight causes cancer in human beings. Most studies that have attempted to find a cause have only found correlations and many scientists have established the the toxicity level of the human body which reacts with the UV spectrum is what causes cancer, not the sunlight itself.

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