Could a Nap A Day Save Your Life?

August 19, 2016

Napping is not just for dogs and children. Some of the world’s most influential thinkers and leaders have catnapped every day. Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill, Salvador Dali, John F Kennedy and Calvin Coolidge all found that a short snooze left them refreshed, recharged and ready to work. Science confirms that napping can help beat the post lunch slump and boost cognitive performance, but now there is evidence that a siesta could also save your life.

You probably don’t need me to tell you that a nap can make you feel better; more alert, sharper and less grumpy. Research has shown that naps can improve our problem solving abilities and our memories, naps can also enhance perceptive skills and speed up reaction times. But the benefits go way beyond that. Short daytime sleeps have been shown to be good for the heart, decrease blood pressure, help our bodies cope with stress and even help us battle the bulge.

Naps and the heart

Regular naps have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease. Those who have a siesta at least three times a week were shown in research to be more than a third less likely to die of cardiovascular disease.

A leading scientist from the extensive study, Dimitrios Trichopoulos of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston said

“Taking a nap could turn out to be an important weapon in the fight against coronary mortality.”

The effect proved to be particularly strong for working men. Those who regularly took a little time out from their working day to have a short snooze had a sixty-four percent lower risk of death from heart disease. However, even non-workers showed a benefit. Those occasionally napping had a twelve percent lower coronary mortality rate and those who systematically napped had a thirty-seven percent reduction in death from cardiovascular events.

Naps and stress

We’ve all been there, after a few late nights it can be difficult to deal with the stresses and strains of the working day. Little problems suddenly seem insurmountable and it’s not just our minds that struggle when we’re sleep deprived, our bodies suffer too.

When we’re under psychological pressure the body releases chemicals designed to help us fight or flee. When we’re tired even more of these stress hormones flood through the body. That was great when we were cavemen fighting sabre-toothed tigers, but in the modern world when stress is sustained and psychological the results are potentially deadly. The hormones can ramp up blood pressure and blood sugar levels predisposing to diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

The good news is that research shows that naps can mitigate the effects of too little sleep, decrease the release of these stress chemicals and help protect our bodies from the negative effects of stress.

So if napping is so good, why are many of us so embarrassed or ashamed of it? I mean let’s face it, whether it’s called a siesta, bhat gum or rice sleep, an afternoon snooze is ingrained into many cultures. But in the US, the UK and many other western societies, sleeping in the daytime can be seen as laziness, a sign of getting old or lacking drive. With 650,000 Americans dying of heart disease every year, maybe it’s time to change the way think and the way we work.

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