The Forgotten Celtic History of Ancient Poland

March 24, 2016

The ancient history of Poland is more connected with Goths and other local tribes than with the Celts. However, during many excavations archaeologists have discovered links between the modern territory of Poland and old Celtic tribes.

For example, archaeological excavations show that the Celts arrived and created a settlement in Poland. They probably came via the area of Morawy in the Czech Republic circa 400 BC. The first group arrived to Lower Silesia, south from the city Wroclaw. Another group of Celts created settlements in the area near Crackow (Kraków), and all the area of Lesser Poland Voivodeship.

By studying the discovered sites, Polish researchers started to realize that the culture of the territory of Poland in the late Iron Age was highly influenced by the Celtic culture. Poland has never been a part of the Roman Empire, so the influence of mixed aspects of different pre-Roman tribes, including the Goths, Scythians, etc., created the earliest history of the country in Central Europe.

The Peaceful Cultural Domination of the Celts

What’s interesting is that there is no proof of conflict between the Celts and the tribes which were conquered by them. It seems that they didn’t fight, but accepted each other and united their powers. The Celtic settlements contain elements of autochthonous cultures. They came to Poland perhaps due to economic issues.

Poland has always been a very good place for farming and mining. The land was rich in iron ore, copper ore, salt, gold, etc. Moreover, previous settlements of the Celts were overpopulated. Controlling the land of current Poland was also important due to the value of the Amber Trail, which was one of the most important trade trails of the ancient world.

The first groups were established in Silesia on the left bank of the Oder River. Excavations show that they were there in approximately 400 – 120 BC. The characteristic Celtic burials and other examples for Celtic sites were discovered in and around the village of Glubczyce.

Another site, in Wojkowice, contained a well preserved grave of a woman from the 3rd century BC. Inside the grave, researchers discovered Celtic treasure of iron bracelets, rings, chains, and brooches.

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