Will ET Be Here Soon? NASA Brings Scientists, Theologians Together

February 4, 2020

In large part, thanks to NASA’s Kepler spacecraft, more than 1,400 planets have been identified beyond Earth.

A few days ago, NASA tried closing the gap between life on Earth and the possibilities of life elsewhere. The space agency and the Library of Congress (image below left) brought together scientists, historians, philosophers and theologians from around the world for a two-day symposium, “Preparing For Discovery.” Their agenda: To explore how we prepare for the inevitable discovery of extraterrestrial life, be it simple microbial organisms or intelligent beings.

Will ET Be Here Soon? NASA Brings Scientists, Theologians Together To Prepare

Lee Speigel

Looking for extraterrestrial life is akin to a search for a cosmic needle-in-a-haystack, as evidenced by the above incredible Hubble Space Telescope image showing approximately 10,000 galaxies.

In large part, thanks to NASA’s Kepler spacecraft, more than 1,400 planets have been identified beyond Earth.

A few days ago, NASA tried closing the gap between life on Earth and the possibilities of life elsewhere. The space agency and the Library of Congress (image below left) brought together scientists, historians, philosophers and theologians from around the world for a two-day symposium, “Preparing For Discovery.” Their agenda: To explore how we prepare for the inevitable discovery of extraterrestrial life, be it simple microbial organisms or intelligent beings.

“We’re looking at all scenarios about finding life. If you find microbes, that’s one thing. If you find intelligence, it’s another. And if they communicate, it’s something else, and depending on what they say, it’s something else!” said astronomer, symposium organizer and former chief NASA historian, Steven J. Dick.

“The idea is not to wait until we make a discovery, but to try and prepare the public for what the implications might be when such a discovery is made,” Dick told The Huffington Post. “I think the reason that NASA is backing this is because of all the recent activity in the discovery of exoplanets and the advances in astrobiology in general.

“People just consider it much more likely now that we’re going to find something — probably microbes first and maybe intelligence later,” he added. “The driving force behind this is from a scientific point of view that it seems much more likely now that we are going to find life at some point in the future.”

Among the many speakers at last week’s astrobiology symposium, one has raised a few international eyebrows in recent years.

“I believe [alien life exists], but I have no evidence. I would be really excited and it would make my understanding of my religion deeper and richer in ways that I can’t even predict yet, which is why it would be so exciting,” Brother Guy Consolmagno, a Jesuit brother, astronomer and Vatican planetary scientist told HuffPost senior science editor David Freeman.

Consolmagno has publicly stated his belief that “any entity — no matter how many tentacles it has — has a soul,” and he’s suggested that he would be happy to baptize any ETs, as long as they requested it.

“There has to be freedom to do science. Being a good scientist means admitting we never have the whole truth — there’s always more to learn.” Consolmagno also doesn’t think the public would panic when or if it’s revealed that alien life has been found.

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